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New vehicle registrations steady

David Crawford, Chief Executive Officer of the Motor Industry Association says “April new vehicle registrations of 10,423 vehicles were down 2 per cent (212 units) in April 2017 reflecting a stable market. Year to date the market is marginally up by 1.4 per cent (704 units) compared to the first four months of 2017.”

David Crawford, chief executive officer of the MIA

Registrations of 6,848 passenger and SUV vehicles for the month of April were down 2.1 per cent (148 units) on April 2017 and registrations of 3,575 commercial vehicles was marginally down by 1.8 per cent (64 units) on April 2017.”

Toyota remains the overall market leader with 13 percent market share (1,310 units), followed by Ford with 11 per cent (1,115 units) and Mazda with 9 per cent market share (893 units).

Mazda was the market leader for passenger and SUV registrations with 11 per cent market share (760 units) followed by Toyota with 10 per cent (712 units) and Holden with 8 per cent market share (540 units).

In the commercial sector, Ford regained the market lead with 22 per cent market share (803 units) followed by Toyota with 17 per cent (598 units) and Holden with 9 per cent market share (312 units).

Four of the top five selling models for the month of April were light commercial vehicles with the Mazda CX-5 (SUV) splitting the list in the third spot. The Ford Ranger was back at the top of the bestselling vehicle model table with 745 units. This was followed by the Toyota Hilux with 457 units and the Mazda CX-5 with 317 units.

The Pick Up/Chassis Cab 4×4 segment came in as the top segment for the month of April with 15 per cent market share. This was closely followed by the SUV Medium segment also with 15 per cent of the market, and the SUV compact with 14 per cent market share. The top five segments were all light commercial vehicles and SUV’s, reflecting the ongoing popularity of these vehicles.

“The market for new vehicles remains at historically high levels with registrations underpinned by a range of economic factors. Net immigration, while reducing is still elevated based on long-term trends, new vehicle prices remain competitive and the economy is stable” said Mr Crawford.

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MIA praises emissions report

The Motor Industry Association (MIA) has welcomed the Productivity Commission’s draft report on a low-emissions economy, which was released on April 27.

David Crawford, chief executive officer of the MIA

David Crawford, chief executive officer of the MIA, says the documents contain important analysis and recommendations to stimulate an essential debate on measures to accelerate a reduction of New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions. “The new-vehicle sector welcomes the opportunity to participate in a discussion on measures that would be effective in achieving an acceleration of reduction in greenhouse gases,” he says.

Greenhouse gas emissions from transport are around 18.4 per cent of New Zealand’s total emissions. It’s the third largest sector behind energy at 22.5 per cent and agriculture with 47.9 per cent, according to 2015 figures as used by the Productivity Commission.

Crawford says: “To avoid distortions in long-term resource allocation, it’s important a low-emissions economy includes all gases and sectors. It’s time to have a discussion on the incorporation of agriculture into our regulatory approach to reduce greenhouse emissions as it will remove a current distortionary effect that places an unfair burden on the other sectors.

“When it comes to transport, New Zealand is a technology taker. How we leverage the importation of low-carbon technological innovations is important, especially given the high volume of old imported vehicles that are on average one to two generations behind technologies found in new vehicles.”

The MIA believes there’s scope to make better use of economic pricing signals to influence vehicle-purchasing decisions, especially those that make it easy for consumers to identify the relative fuel efficiency of models. Making it easier and more transparent for consumers to understand a vehicle’s greenhouse gas performance and associated cost is more likely to be successful in changing consumers purchasing patterns.

“Discussion on transport incentives and disincentives within the draft report are welcomed as it stimulates a healthy debate on what policy measures are best for New Zealand,” says Crawford.

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VIA working with the MIA on airbag recall

Minister of Consumer Affairs Kris Faafoi has now announced a mandatory recall for at-risk (alpha type) Takata airbag inflators.

VIA, the Imported Motor Vehicle Industry Association, is now working with the new vehicle distributors and their association, the MIA, to develop processes and protocols for managing this recall.

VIA will meet with the MIA and new vehicle distributors on Wednesday 11 April, to agree the process and terms for managing replacement of recalled airbags in used imports. 

Both groups will then convene with MBIE’s working group on Thursday 12 April, so that the proposed measures can be approved by the Government.

According to current data, there are 68,116 imported used vehicles with the alpha type inflator in New Zealand. While 22,494 vehicles have had the inflator replaced, another 45,622 are still to be completed.

VIA will continue to communicate all developments to our members as they arise.

For any questions, please contact VIA Technical Manager Malcolm Yorston on 0800 VIA VIA (842 842) or email technical@via.org.nz.

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MIA welcomes mandatory airbag recall

David Crawford, Chief Executive Officer of the MIA says ‘the Takata airbag recall is unprecedented in scale, it is a massively large and complex logistical issue affecting new and used vehicles with two different types of Takata airbags. The alpha type airbag inflator fitted to vehicles between 2001 and 2006 is more at risk of failure if activated than other types of Takata airbag inflators. Completion of the recall will require the cooperation of government and industry to undertake and the MIA welcomes the Government’s decision to make the alpha type airbag recall mandatory.’

David Crawford, chief executive officer of the MIA

The MIA undertook a stocktake of affected vehicles in New Zealand during March which revealed that there are around 11,280 New Zealand new vehicles with the alpha type inflator of which 6,485 have had the inflator replaced with 4,795 remaining to be completed. However, there are now 68,116 used vehicles with the alpha type inflator and while 22,494 vehicles had had the inflator replaced, there remains another 45,622 to be completed.

The issue is exacerbated by importers of used vehicles who have continued to import vehicles which have not had recalls closed out in the country they are sourcing their vehicles from. Mostly these vehicles have been proceeding through import compliance without checking and then on-sold to unsuspecting New Zealand consumers. It is then left up to New Zealand distributors to try and identify these vehicles and endeavour to manage a recall.

Contrary to common misunderstanding, under New Zealand legislation New Zealand distributors of new vehicles are not obliged to undertake recalls of used imported vehicles. New Zealand consumer legislation places consumer obligations, including recalls, on the supplier of the goods, which in this case is the importer of the used vehicle. The MIA is not opposing imports of used vehicles, but these vehicles should not be on-sold to consumers with outstanding (open) recalls.

The MIA has a code of practice which encourages New Zealand Distributors to recall used imported vehicles when these vehicles have been imported prior to a recall being announced. However, the continued importation of used vehicles with a known recall in the market vehicles are being sourced from, places an unacceptable burden on consumers.

MIA welcomes the Government’s decision to prevent any vehicle with an open recall from passing compliance and entry into the New Zealand fleet.

 

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Market for new vehicles remains strong

David Crawford, Chief Executive Officer of the Motor Industry Association says “March new vehicle registrations of 14,028 vehicles were up 1 per cent (159 units) on March 2017 reflecting a stable market. Year to date the market is up 2 per cent (916 units) compared to the first three months of 2017.”

Registrations of 9,050 passenger and SUV vehicles for the month of March were down 2 per cent (180 units) on March 2017. However, registrations of 4,978 commercial vehicles continues to grow strongly being up 7 per cent (339 units) on March 2017.”

Toyota remains the overall market leader with 17% market share (2,421 units), followed by Ford with 11% (1,551 units) and Mitsubishi with 8% market share (1,104 units).

Toyota was also the market leader for passenger and SUV registrations with 13 per cent market share (1,196 units) followed by Mazda with 9 per cent (858 units) and Mitsubishi with 8 per cent market share (722 units).

In the commercial sector, Toyota remained the market leader with 25 per cent market share (1,225 units) followed by Ford with 21 per cent (1,047 units) and Holden with 9 per cent market share (427 units).

The top four selling models for the month of March were all light commercial vehicles. The Toyota Hilux was back at the top of the bestselling vehicle model table with 915 units. This was closely followed by the Ford Ranger with 912 units and the Holden Colorado with 427 units.

The SUV medium segment regained the top segment for the month of March with 18 per cent market share. This was followed by the Pick Up/Chassis Cab 4×4 segment also with 16 per cent of the market, and the SUV compact with 13 per cent market share.

“The market for new vehicles is mature and remains strong, said Mr Crawford

“The economic factors of the past two years are still largely present with strong net immigration, affordable prices and strong economy.” 

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New vehicle registrations slightly down

February 2018’s new vehicle registrations are slightly down on February 2017, according to the Motor Industry Association’s (MIA) latest statistics.

David Crawford, chief executive officer of the MIA

David Crawford, Chief Executive Officer of the MIA says “February new vehicle registrations of 11,531 vehicles were down 2 per cent (254 units) on February 2017 reflecting a mature and stable market. Year to date the market is up 3 per cent (751 units) compared to the first two months of 2017.”

Registrations of 7,415 passenger and SUV vehicles for the month of February were down 8 per cent (637 units) on February 2017. However, registrations of 4,116 commercial vehicles continues to grow strongly being up 10 per cent on February 2017.”

Toyota remains the overall market leader with 17 per cent market share (1,959 units), followed by Ford with 10 per cent (1,183 units) and Holden with 8 per cent market share (968 units).

Toyota was also the market leader for passenger and SUV registrations with 14 per cent market share (1013 units) followed by Mazda with 10 per cent (773 units) and Holden with 8 per cent market share (602 units).

In the commercial sector, Toyota regained the market lead with 23 per cent market share (946 units) followed by Ford with 19 per cent (788 units) and Nissan with 9 per cent  market share (384 units).

The top four selling models for the month of February were all light commercial vehicles. The Ford Ranger was back at the top of the bestselling vehicle model table with 735 units. This was followed by the Toyota Hilux with 703 units and the Nissan Navara with 384 units.

With the record number of commercial vehicles sold during the month of February it came as no surprise to see the Pickup/Chassis Cab 4×4 segment as the top segment with 17 per cent of the market for the month. The SUV medium segment accounted for 16% of the market, followed by the SUV compact with 12 per cent market share.

“While the market for new vehicles remains strong, some vehicle segments were constrained by low stocks levels, which will continue into the foreseeable future.” said Mr Crawford.

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MIA calls on Govt. for assistance with airbag recall

A technician holds a recalled Takata airbag inflator.

At present, there is around 320,000 new and used vehicles in New Zealand affected by the Takata recall process, of which the owners of approximately two thirds have received letters (recall notices) and around 134,000 owners have bought their vehicles in for the recall to be completed. 

The faulty Takata airbags has led to at least 23 deaths worldwide and more than 230 serious injuries. Takata’s airbag inflators can explode with excessive force, unleashing metal shrapnel inside cars and trucks.

David Crawford, Chief Executive Officer of the Motor Industry Association (MIA) says “this is large and complex logistical issue affecting new and used vehicles with two different types of Takata airbags and current owners of vehicles having a choice as to whether they want to close out the recall. At present there is no mandatory process requiring owners of vehicles to undertake a recall if they are notified by the manufacturer to do so.”

Consequently, the MIA has asked the Government to find a mechanism which requires owners of affected vehicles to bring their vehicles into a franchised dealer for the recalled component to be replaced if they do not respond to letters from manufacturers within a reasonable time period.

The MIA are also want assistance with preventing used imported vehicles from completing import compliance unless those importing vehicles can demonstrate those vehicles have had their recalls completed.

This follows from yesterday’s announcement by the Australian government, who announced that they are ordering a compulsory recall of more than 2 million cars fitted with Takata airbags. The compulsory recall is one of the largest of its kind and follows voluntary recalls by carmakers last year affecting 1.7 million vehicles.

For more on this story, read the March issue of Autofile magazine. Subscribe here.

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Highest ever January for new vehicle registrations

Continuing the trend for the last five years, last month’s new vehicle registrations of 14,834 was a record month for January. Registrations were up 7.3 per cent or 1011 units on January 2017.

New passenger vehicle registrations of 10,797 units were up 6.4 per cent (647 units) on January 2017. Commercial vehicle registrations of 4,037 units were up 9.9 per cent (364 units) on January 2017.

Toyota remains the overall market leader with 22 per cent market share (3,270 units), followed by Ford with 11 per cent (1,654 units) and Mazda with eight per cent market share (1,197 units).

Toyota was also the market leader for passenger and SUV registrations with nearly a quarter of the market at 23 per cent market share (2,490 units) followed by Mazda with nine per cent (1,025 units) and Ford with eight per cent market share (846 units).

In the commercial sector, Ford was again the market leader with 20 per cent (808 units) followed by Toyota with 19 per cent (780 units) and Holden with 10 per cent market share (385 units).

The Toyota Corolla begins 2018 back at the top of the bestselling vehicle model table with 958 units. The Ford Ranger was the second bestselling model for the month of January with 713 units followed by the Toyota Hilux with 636 units. The Toyota Corolla was the top selling rental model for January with 696 units.

The SUV medium segment accounted for 16 per cent of the market, followed by the small passenger segment with 14 per cent and the SUV compact with 13 per cent market share.

“The strength of growth in the new vehicle market ran somewhat against expectations, making it once again the strongest ever start to a new sales year,” says David Crawford, chief executive officer of the Motor Industry Association.

“As 2018 gets underway, nothing has changed with the economic environment that existed for most of the last 24 months. The key drivers of new vehicle sales remain the continued elevated levels of net immigration, low costs of debt, a strong national economy and a stable government,” he says.

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Record year for registrations

Latest figures show a record number of new vehicle registrations for the month of November.

The latest figures from the Motor Industry Association show a record number of new vehicle registrations for the month of November, making it the strongest month of November on record.

This has ultimately made the 2017 calendar year the leading year on record for registrations of new vehicles in New Zealand, with one month to go. 

David Crawford, Chief Executive Officer of the Motor Industry Association says, “there were 14,594 new vehicle registrations for the month of November, making it the strongest month of November on record. It also took the 2017 calendar year past the full 2016 year making it the strongest year on record for registrations of new vehicles in New Zealand, the fourth consecutive year in a row. Total registrations of new vehicles for the 2017 year to date[1] were 148,335 and this exceeds the 2016 full year total of 146,753 vehicles by 1,582 units. Registrations for the year to date were 9.5% year to date above this time in 2016.”

Year to date, sales of passenger and SUVs were up by 6.2% (5,888 units) and commercial vehicles by 16.9% (6,952 units) compared to this time in 2016.

For the month of November, Toyota remains the overall market leader with 22% market share (3,227 units), followed by Ford with 11% (1,546 units) and Holden with 10% market share (1,489 units).

Toyota was also the market leader for passenger and SUV registrations with 23% market share (2,358 units) followed by Holden with 11% (1,149 units) and Mazda with 9% market share (904 units). The top selling passenger and SUV models for the month were the Toyota Corolla (814 units) followed by the Toyota RAV4 (648 units) and the Toyota Highlander (445 units).  

In the commercial sector, Ford was the market leader with 22% (943 units) followed by Toyota with 20% (869 units) and Holden third with 8% market share (340 units). The Ford Ranger retained the top spot as the bestselling commercial model with 20% share (874 units) followed by the Toyota Hilux with 14% share (620 units). Year to date the Ford Ranger remains both the top commercial vehicle model and the top model overall with 8,824 registrations compared to 7,664 for the Toyota Hilux.

Vehicle segmentation for the month of November returns to more normal patterns of recent times with the top four spots taken up by SUVs and light commercial vehicles. The top segments were SUV medium vehicles with 19% share, followed by  the Pick Up/Chassis Cab 4×4 segment with 13% and SUV Large with 12% market share.

“With one month to go the question on everyone’s lips is whether the total for the year will break through the 160,000 mark for the first time. The 150,000 total mark for a calendar year is no longer a question” said Mr Crawford.

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Associations’ proud pasts

Japanese cars waiting exportation

The Motor Industry Association (MIA) and Imported Motor Vehicle Industry Association (VIA) have an important and colourful past. Autofile Online takes a look.

The VIA was formed in 1989 by dealers for dealers. It is a business association, and helps members manage and develop their businesses by providing support and advice.

Nowadays, the VIA represents a wider group involved in importing used vehicles into New Zealand. Its members include Kiwi wholesalers and retailers, customs agents, transport companies, shipping companies, compliance shops, and Japanese, UK and Singaporean vehicle exporters.  

The VIA basically kick-started the used-vehicle import industry in New Zealand. It developed seatbelt anchorage systems for used Japanese vehicles, developed testing and certification procedures, established VINZ to provide competitive inspection services and saved dealers more than $135 million by negotiating the removal of tariffs.

It also saved importers $19m by taking the Customs Department to the Court of Appeal, forced the Parliamentary Regulations Review Committee to review the Minister of Transport’s frontal-impact regulations, resists the introduction of unreasonable legislation and rules, and continually lobbies government departments on behalf of the trade.

The MIA represents importers and distributors of new cars, trucks and motorbikes. It was set up to provide a unified voice and drive progress on issues that concern the sector – such as vehicle safety, emissions, fuel economy, consumer standards, industry training and codes of practice. It is made up of some 41 members covering 78 marques over three vehicle classes – light automotive, heavy automotive and motorcycles.

The association was formed in 1996, bringing together AMIDNZ, the new vehicle importers’ association, with the Motor Vehicle Manufacturers’ Association for assemblers of completely knocked down (CKD) vehicles. In January 2007, the MIA merged with the Motorcycle Distributors’ Association.

The MIA is involved in a wide range of industry issues. It operates several committees that deal with sector specific interests, such as vehicle safety and design, heavy vehicles and vehicle registration.

Distributors supply new vehicles that meet transport rules. When developing new rules, the MIA advocates the government take into account key principles. These are work towards rule harmonisation with source markets, avoid unique country rules, standardise with key source market regimes and align the introduction of new standards with those markets.

They also include allowing adequate lead times for the phase-in of new standards particularly when they need significant development which may require several years to design, test and comply to international standards, and avoid situations where individual distributors use rules to gain a market advantage.

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United voice for industry

Cars discharged at Captain Cook Wharf. Ports of Auckland is a common issue between the MIA and VIA.

Many people in New Zealand’s automotive industry have been talking about two of its lead organisations signing an historic agreement to work more closely together. 

The Imported Motor Vehicle Industry Association (VIA) and Motor Industry Association (MIA) are now working within the terms of a memorandum of understanding (MoU), previously reported by Autofile Online. Now we look at the issue in more depth.

In the past, the two organisations – with VIA representing used motor-vehicle imports and MIA being the association for the new vehicle sector – were often at loggerheads, but in more recent times they have often worked closely on certain issues. Now – with the MoU after been signed – the MIA and VIA have officially recorded the agreement reached on the working relationship between the two.

The “precepts and principles” the VIA and MIA have agreed on include them recognising and respecting “the autonomy and individual characteristics of each other, the constituencies they represent and their governance and management procedures”.

In the future, they are aiming to collaborate on areas of mutual interest in good faith “with the aim of presenting a united voice for the motor-vehicle industry”.  That said, the VIA and MIA will identify issues on which they have different policies or positions with each association retaining the right to advocate for its own position on such matters.

There will also be a “no surprises” policy. This means policy decisions, announcements and advocacy action on contentious issues will be communicated with the other association in advance.

Costs incurred should “lie where they fall”, which means each association will be responsible for its own costs. In the event of a joint undertaking that’s likely to incur significant costs in excess of usual operational costs, the financing of such an undertaking and the apportionment of costs will be agreed between the MIA and VIA in advance.  

The VIA and MIA will consider co-opting other motor industry associations – such as the Motor Trade Association, Road Transport Forum and AA – as and when appropriate.

The MIA and VIA cite examples of issues with common interest between the two organisations as intelligent transport, autonomous vehicles, electric vehicles, development of standards for vehicles, infrastructure and related issues, Ports of Auckland, recall protocols and procedure, ACC vehicle risk-rating, statistics and media releases.

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